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"We were told to stand where we had stood in the original picture.  I was so sad because I had to stand alone.  The people who stood on either side of me had died.  It was very sad to have just the eleven of us." — pianist Marian McPartland

For its February 1996 issue, Life magazine sought to recreate the famous 1958 “A Great Day in Harlem” photograph when Gordon Parks was commissioned to photograph eleven of the surviving members of the original photograph on the steps of the brownstone building at 17 West 126th Street in Harlem.  
Sonny Rollins and Ernie Wilkins were unable to attend, but positioned as they were on that ‘great day’ in 1958 were Hank Jones, Eddie Locke, Horace Silver, Gerry Mulligan, Milt Hinton, Chubby Jackson, Art Farmer, Benny Golson, Johnny Griffin, Marian McPartland and Taft Jordan Jr. (seated), who had accompanied his trumpeter father to the original shoot and sat on the curb right next to Count Basie.  The building, now a roofless shell, had not held up as well as had some of the musicians.  Contributing photographer, Gordon Parks, took the picture, a sort of victory lap for the survivors.

"We were told to stand where we had stood in the original picture.  I was so sad because I had to stand alone.  The people who stood on either side of me had died.  It was very sad to have just the eleven of us." — pianist Marian McPartland

For its February 1996 issue, Life magazine sought to recreate the famous 1958 “A Great Day in Harlem” photograph when Gordon Parks was commissioned to photograph eleven of the surviving members of the original photograph on the steps of the brownstone building at 17 West 126th Street in Harlem.  

Sonny Rollins and Ernie Wilkins were unable to attend, but positioned as they were on that ‘great day’ in 1958 were Hank Jones, Eddie Locke, Horace Silver, Gerry Mulligan, Milt Hinton, Chubby Jackson, Art Farmer, Benny Golson, Johnny Griffin, Marian McPartland and Taft Jordan Jr. (seated), who had accompanied his trumpeter father to the original shoot and sat on the curb right next to Count Basie.  The building, now a roofless shell, had not held up as well as had some of the musicians.  Contributing photographer, Gordon Parks, took the picture, a sort of victory lap for the survivors.

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